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Guinness World Records

Narwhal Pens | purepens.co.uk

Ross Adams |

There are many weird and wonderful records held all over the world, here are a few interesting records held relating to pens.

  • Record for the largest fountain pen is held in Poland, 1991. It is 2.2metres long, 11cm in diameter and has a nib length of 48cm. The total weight of the pen with ink was 9.5kg.
  • The world's smallest fountain pen was made by Waterman dating from the 1910's. It is a safety eyedropper fill pen also referred to as the doll pen. It measures just 42.3mm long and 3.0mm in diameter.
  • The largest working ball pen recorded was in India in 2011 and was 5.5 metres long and weighed 37.23 kg.
  • The largest collection of ball pens is held by Angelika Unverhau in Germany (2004). She owns 285,150 ball pens (without duplicates).
  • The record for the most versatile pen was designed by Fisher Space Pen Co. in 1968. It was first used on the Apollo 7 mission in 1968 and is a design of pen still used today. It uses nitrogen-pressurised cartridges to dispense visco-elastic ink. It can be used in extreme heat and cold, underwater and in zero-gravity.
  • Hungarian Ladislo Biro created the first ball point pen in 1938. They went on sale in 1944 and cost the equivalent of £60 today. The first organisation to use the biro was the Royal Air Force who needed a pen that didn't leak at high altitudes.
  • The world's largest drawing by an individual is currently held by Ravi Soni, India. His artwork is 629.98 metres squared. This is the 12th successful attempt at this record. It was previously held by Italian illustrator and graphic designer FRA! who completed a 568.47 metre squared piece with a simple black marker pen.
  • The largest pencil was recorded in 2007 in America and measured 23.23 metres long and weighed 98.43 tonnes! It was even topped with an eraser.
  • The largest art lesson was recorded on 24th February 2018 in the Philippines. The class was attended by 16,692 people.

Recorded by Guinness World Records and correct at time of this blog being published.